Local schools introduce creative planet protection leading into summer

Local schools introduce creative planet protection leading into summer

As seen on Patch.com and BucksCountyAlive.com:

How much does it mean for Americans to participate in protecting their planet?

There’s a Parisian summit that meets annually in wintertime, featuring representatives from every participating country who debate on issues relating to the preservation of our planet, such as the ongoing concern of climate change. Then there’s Earth Day, known as “the world’s largest environmental movement,” which is taking place on Sunday, April 22. The latter emphasizes eliminating plastics from waste, and usage all together. Trevose Day School and Neshaminy Montessori, both landmark educational institutions in Bucks County, PA, for more than 45 years, will honor the movement and more.

The study body will participate in Earth Day-friendly activities, eat healthy snacks and pack waste-free lunches. The school has announced new events this year to include: Cleaning the yard of unnecessary debris and leaves, weeding and mulching on-site gardens, planting donated cabbage plants, launching a kitchen scrap garden (produce that is starting to go bad that contains seed and various vegetable scraps with spoiled seeds start rooting in containers, which focuses on making the most of food), recycling relay races to sort what is and isn’t recyclable, participating in arts and crafts using only recycled paper, and last but not least, painting pre-existing rocks to make the garden even more colorful and enjoyable by all.

“The children even design and draw their own Earth Day shirts, which you can see on Trevose Day School’s website,” says Head of School Gwynne Frischmann, who has helped carry out this initiative for the so far 12 years that she’s held her post. “We love doing outdoor learning opportunities during school and for our summer camp.”

What Frischmann’s students learn about Earth Day and its true meaning parlay well into students’ summer activities, perhaps without the kids even knowing it. Nearly all summer activities will have outdoor features in the toddler and “Young Explorers” camps. A lot of this summer’s curriculum will include outdoorsy activities, many of which depend on the quality nature provides. By raising our students to be connected with nature, this creates sensitivity to their environment, and helps them want to take care of the earth, its wildlife and nature as a whole, and then the next generation could feel the impact as well. This, among other reasons, is why Frischmann ensures her students learn early on about the importance of environmental preservation.

The Trevose Day School and Neshaminy Montessori schools have been a staple of the Bucks County educational community since the early ‘70s. The former enrolls children from pre-k through 5th grade, while its sister Montessori school welcomes kids between the ages of 2.5 and 6 years old. Both also offer summer camps depending on age and activities that children are interested in. For more information on upcoming programs, visit trevosedayschool.org and neshaminymontessori.org.

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